General Social Work Cover Letter Examples

An engaging cover letter is a great way to get an employer to read your resume. With the following tips and social worker cover letter example, you will have the tools to create a more polished cover letter yourself.

  • Do use your cover letter to tell an engaging story. If social work has been your life’s ambition, use events in your past to explain your experience and passion for this kind of work.
  • Do not focus on what you expect to get out of working for a company. Hiring managers care more about what you can do for them, not the other way around.
  • Do highlight rare experiences that have made you a great employee. One way to do this is to mention people you have met in your time as a social worker who have had an impact on you.
  • Do not forget to look over an employer’s website before sending in your resume. This gives you a chance to understand the company’s voice so you can mimic that in your cover letter.

Social Worker Advice

Want to make a major difference in the lives of people in need? Consider a career as a social worker. Social workers work with a variety of people every day help to help improve lives and solve problems. Being a social worker is as much a calling as a job, but you’ll still need an outstanding cover letter. The cover letter examples below can help put you on the path to the meaningful career you want. Use these cover letter examples as a guide to writing and formatting, and create your own cover letter with confidence!

Cover Letter Tips for Social Worker

Finding jobs as a Social Worker means keeping the right mindset and putting to use some effective job seeking skills. The tips below can help keep you on track during the job hunt.

1. Stay positive. Having a positive mindset can help you keep things in perspective and remember that your unemployment is only temporary. You might consider joining a support group and connecting with others in the same position.

2. Set goals for yourself. Setting goals that can be achieved on a weekly or daily basis will help maximize your productivity. For example, you might try sending out a certain number of cover letters per week.

3. Keep an open mind. Although you may have had your sights set on a particular field or industry, keeping an open mind will allow more opportunities to come your way.

4. Connect with your network. Reach out to personal and professional contacts who could offer insight into the job market. This advice will be useful and you never know where your next lead could come from.

5. Make a presence on social media. Make use of websites such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn to help expand your network.

Social Worker Job Seeking Tips

When it comes to finding jobs as a Social Worker, remember that your cover letter will work as your calling card. Keep your cover letter in top shape by following the tips below.

1. Don’t exceed two pages. With the exception of academics and doctors who might use curricula vitae (CVs), there is no need to write over two pages.

2. Do use bullet points for listing items and align the text flush left. These formatting standards will immensely improve the organization of your writing.

3. Don’t rely on generic language. Avoid the overly used phrases such as “team player” and “detail oriented,” as they take away from the originality of your writing.

4. Do introduce your work history section with a “Summary of Skills” section. Doing so provides an overview of your professional qualifications.

5. Do list your work history section in the following suggested order: title of position, employer, city and state of employer, and employment dates.

If you’re applying for a role in social work, you need to make a good first impression. Being a social worker is hard work, but also extremely worthwhile. So, what can you do to make sure your application is a certainty for the short list?

If you need some inspiration on what to include in your CV and cover letter, check out our handy examples. (Just remember not to copy them as exact templates.)

Cover letter example:

Dear Ms Name,

As a fully qualified [child/adult] social worker with [number] years experience, I feel I would be well-suited for the role of [job title] at [name of council or organisation]. Please find my CV attached.

The nature of my experience includes successfully managing a demanding caseload, which includes [elderly people/young children/people who have learning disabilities /mental health issues]. I have a [person-centred] approach to my work, which involves calmly and practically responding to service users to achieve the best outcomes. I am also experienced in coordinating care with other agencies, such as primary care practices and psychological services.

In addition, I have a particular interest in [...]. This stimulated me to lead a community project on [...]. As part of this, I had to liaise with [...] meaning that I have developed skills in [...]. I faced some challenges along the way, such as [...] and overcame them by [...]. The impact of the project overall was measured by/ has been evidenced in [...].

As shown by my experience in [social work/social work placements], I am enthusiastic about establishing what is best for the individual and always strive to do the best for service users. I am able to successfully manage a demanding caseload. I also have the enthusiasm and determination to ensure that I make a success of this role.

Thank you for taking the time to consider this application and I look forward to hearing from you in future.

Yours sincerely,

Name

CV template:

CV and cover letter tips:

“The most important thing about your CV and cover letter is that everything you include is relevant,” says Craig Davis, head of social work for Sanctuary. “Don’t start going off on a tangent, or waffling – every part has to be tailored to the role you’re applying for.”

Tom Hawkins, director of Hays Social Care, adds that you should keep your cover letter short. “Don’t over-elaborate, and don’t repeat what’s on your CV. The key things you need to include are: the reason you’re applying, the reason you want to move on from your current employment, and the things that you have in your armoury that make you suitable for the job.”

As social work is a vocational profession, it’s also important that you evidence enthusiasm for the job. “Don’t be scared to sound passionate about what you do – why you do it and why you enjoy it,” he adds.

In your CV it’s also worth including any information that the hiring manager might need as a “tick box” exercise in the application process: such as whether you have an up-to-date DBS check, or registration with relevant social work bodies.

“Be as clear as you can in your writing,” says Hawkins. “So use bullet points to describe roles, rather than long and prosaic sentences. Try and start each bullet point with a verb, such as ‘created, managed, improved’ – this is a good way to focus info on what you did and the difference it made.”

As much as experience is important, it’s not the only thing hiring managers are looking for. “Some managers will look at someone who has less experience but is more enthusiastic – so be sure to get your passion for the work across in your writing,” adds Davis.

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